Restoring Jersey’s Dance of Death!

houguebieThe grisly Danse Macabre, the Dance of Death, was a common yet dark motif of medieval European religious art. Typically depicting haunting carnivals of leering, dancing skeletons, these provocative representations acted as reminders that death and judgment came to all, whether princess or pauper, bishop or blacksmith. Found all across Europe, an exciting example has recently been discovered in La Hougue Bie on the Channel Island of Jersey. Centre Screen are excited to be part of the project to restore this important artistic work.

Last week, producer Laura Harris and motion graphics designer Joel Hepworth flew to Jersey to carry out projection tests of our AV dealing with the fragment of the mediaeval frieze found on the chapel’s walls.

As well as explaining the historic, religious and artistic background of this sinister artwork, the film will offer a glimpse into the life of the colourful cleric behind the chapel who was possibly responsible for the frieze. And it will end by showing what the Danse Macabre might have looked like in its heyday, with specially-commissioned illustrations brought to life by Joel and the Centre Screen design team.

It’s delivered via a projector hidden in a church lectern, crafted by our project partners at DJW to blend in perfectly with the surroundings. Last week’s task was to ensure that our illustrations line up properly with the original, mediaeval art. So far, it’s looking good – visitors will be able to judge for themselves when the exhibit opens to the public later this year.

Medieval art and contemporary technology.

Medieval art and contemporary technology.

 

The chapel stands above a Neolithic ritual mound.

The chapel stands above a Neolithic ritual mound.

 

 

In Production

Mail Rail For The New Postal Museum Preserving the Historic Nano Nagle Place in Cork The work and life of Isambard Kingdom Brunel